The Wild & Scenic Film Festival line-up challenges, inspires, educates and provokes conversation. The selection of films for the 6th annual festival in Huntsville cover a variety of topics including local activism and community engagement, wildlife appreciation, family adventures and inspiration, light pollution, exploration of unique characters in the environmental movement and so much more. Take a look at the selected film synopsis below. Click here to buy tickets now. 

Film NameFilm Synopsis 
Brothers of Climbing
How can you be what you can’t see? Mikhail Martin, co-founder of Brothers of Climbing said, “I literally typed, ‘Are there black climbers?’ in Google … someone said, ‘black people don’t climb.'” A small group of climbers began to challenge that thought. The Brothers of Climbing is a crew that's making the climbing community more welcoming. Watch to see how they created a community where one wasn’t.
Granddad
Every morning in the summer, Granddad rises at dawn to row twice around the lake. Join him on his morning meditation.
Imagination
We’ve all been that kid sitting in the back seat of our family car, wishing we were somewhere else. Through the boredom, the driveway snow piles, sidewalk handrails and stair sets start to tease our inner skier. Watch day dreams come to life as Tom Wallisch shreds the snowy streets of Nelson, British Columbia.
Lost in Light
Lost in Light is a short film on how light pollution affects the view of the night skies. Shot mostly in California, this piece shows how the night sky view gets progressively better as you move away from the lights.
Love of Place
When an invasive species plant threatens to take over a beautiful desert river, an obsessive park ranger sets out to kill it.
Nobody Dies in Longyearbyen

"They say that when you're hit by the polar bug, you never leave." Don't say we didn't warn you. Nobody dies in Longyearbyen, or so goes the rumor. We went to the northernmost city in the world to find out why, and stumbled into the first act of a science fiction flick about something deadly, long buried in the permafrost.
Walk on the Mountain
As seen through the lens of anti-coal activist Junior Walk, Walk on the Mountain depicts the environmental and economic distress in the coal fields on West Virginia. This documentary tells the real story of the people that live in southern West Virginia- suffering through the decline of coal, fighting battles to feed their families, and deciding where they stand- with Junior or with the coal companies.
Wildlife and the Wall
Filmmaker Ben Masters (Unbranded) goes into the heart of the Big Bend, the last true wilderness in the state of Texas, to consider what effects building a border wall might have on wildlife dispersals, migratory corridors, and access to the Rio Grande, the only water source in a harsh desert environment.
The Accidental Environmentalist: Catherine Flowers (Southern Exposure)A mosquito bite decades ago leads Catherine Coleman Flowers on her life’s journey.

The second in the Southern Exposure series, this captivating film brings viewers into the world of Catherine Coleman Flowers, a Lowndes County, Alabama activist who became passionate about the environment when she found out that tropical diseases, like hookworm, were showing up in her community because of sewage treatment problems. Her journey to solve problems at the intersection of poverty, climate change, and politics has taken her from the Alabama Black Belt to Washington, D.C. to Switzerland and back. She shares her special connection to place and invites you in to a day in her life.
Who's Your Farmer? (Southern Exposure)Farming is a practice that impacts our health, our environment, our communities and our world. Knowing where our food really comes from and how safely it is grown is becoming increasingly difficult. This film explores farming in Alabama through the eyes of local farmers all across the state that care about the land, the water and the people they feed.
Water: Plan On It (Southern Exposure)Alabama currently has no plan for how we will ensure that future generations have enough clean, affordable water. Our rivers and streams are home to more types of fish and aquatic species than any other state in the country, yet our laws do not consider how much water they need to survive. This film describes the current effort underway to develop an Alabama Water Plan and how having an abundance of water does not mean you can take it for granted without consequences.
Ashes to Ashes (Southern Exposure)A small community in Northeast Alabama. A mayor whose town sits on the river’s banks. A businessman in the Mobile Bay. All of these communities are impacted by coal ash in Alabama.

Coal Ash, a pollution by-product of burning coal, is impacting communities across Alabama. Billions of tons of ash are stored in unlined pits alongside our rivers and stream causing harmful pollution such as mercury, arsenic, and many other heavy metal to be dumped into our rivers, lakes, and bays where we fish, swim, and drink. This film tells the grim story of coal ash in Alabama and what you can do to call on the electric utility companies to become leaders by cleaning up the pollution they have created.